Post No 12 Fountains Abbey from Studley Royal   Yorkshire Dales.  This image is featured in my website www.petelapish. art with notations.    I am now going to consider the experimental aspects of painting a ‘ modern art ‘ rendition of an icon of the Yorkshire Dales.   Acrylics can be used ‘ out of a tube ‘ or thinned to a watercolour consistency.    The BIG difference is that when dry the result is PERMANENT and further layers of paint can be applied to modify the result.

After priming the support, in my case now usually M D F as it is stable and is more difficult to damage and again in this case followed up by a ‘ sketchy ‘ drawing up, thoughts can turn to —-” Where do I start with this one and what colours to use “.  It being some time ago since painted, I think that the whole board will have been lightly undercoated with an acrylic ochre, the colour which has remained in the sky.    I have the board at a slightly elevated angle and also use additional tilting.    Short runs of two different colours are applied separately one into the other.     These mix and merge as they travel slowly down.   This after allowing each application to dry is repeated until satisfied.    The reflections are done in a similar manner.

Runs are stopped before penetrating the space to be occupied by the orange bushes to the right  and other spaces.  The green swards to left and right are applied by brush.   They provide the necessary recession to the Abbey.    To break up the vertical aspect of the reflections very thin and light horizontals are continued from the pink and blue-grey reflections over the central water aspect.   The weir and tiny figures give a distance and scale break.

To break up the sky area I ran in areas of white leaving the edges to harden before washing the remainder of the paint.   It looked interestingly different so I left it at that ! ! !      Compositionally  different with the main focus, the Abbey nearly central.     However this is made not too obvious by the right hand features creating a heavier balance to that side.    The trees to both sides give a necessary verticality to the whole paining.

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